Tag Archives | Calibration

Color Volume: Measuring and Understanding What it Means

Coming out of CES 2017, one of the key things you heard thrown around from manufacturers was Color Volume. For the past few years, we’ve heard companies talk about what percentage of the DCI/P3 or Rec.2020 color gamuts they cover, but those are 2D measurements. Color volume adds the third dimension, brightness, to the measurement. So what is color volume, and how should we measure and report on it to best distinguish what a display is capable of? Continue Reading →

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Samsung SUHD Calibration

On April 2nd in New York, Samsung held a press event to celebrate the release of their SUHD TVs. While these have actually been shipping for a bit now, some of the other models were not officially announced yet and the prices were unknown. Far more interesting to me, and many of the reviewers on-hand, was a special event Samsung held before this. We got an in-depth class on what changes are present in HDR and wide gamut content, and how our calibration and testing procedures might need to change. Continue Reading →

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RGB: Full vs. Limited

When using a Blu-ray player or a video game system, you often have many color space selections to choose from. The most common choices available are YCbCr, 4:2:2, 4:4:4, RGB, RGB Full or Enhanced, and RGB Limited. For the most part they output the same content in different ways except for RGB Full. So what does this Color Space control mean, and how should you select it?

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Gamut CIE: Stop Using This Chart!

Everyone needs to stop using the Gamut CIE chart on its own. Home Theater still uses it alone. Same with Projector Central. Many other publications and websites do as well. Some might run it with a matching luminance chart, but not most. They don’t include a DeltaE chart to show errors. There is no saturations chart, and there certainly is no Color Checker chart. The worst part is many of these reviews have no idea how badly they are misleading their readers.

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Theo’s Roundtable – Better Display Measurements

Do you watch baseball? Well, if you do, you can almost certainly tell me what ERA, RBI, and AVG mean in the context of the sport? Can you tell me what WHIP, ERA+, and WAR are? If you can, then you’re up to date on the far better ways we have to model and predict baseball outcomes and making more informed analysis about a player.

However, some people refuse to buy into these new statistics. They think it’s more important that a pitcher have more wins than give up fewer runs, walk fewer batters, or allow fewer hits. Who cares that half of all pitchers NEVER get a chance to bat and score a run themselves, they are at fault if their team doesn’t win! Those new age statistics that try to factor out run support and wins and losses, who needs them?

So now, of course, you’re asking what in the world advanced statistics has to do with video displays?

Basically, many reviews are still using ERA, RBI, and other rudimentary statistical tools instead of more advanced tools that we have available. I’ll open magazines and see the average color temperature in a graph, but no indication of the grayscale or gamma error. Saying a display is accurate because it has a temperature of 6500K is wrong. 6500K might be right, or it might be wrong, but it doesn’t tell you for sure. Just like a pitcher being undefeated might indicate he is good, or it might be that his team scores 40 runs every time he pitches and he can’t lose.

I delve into this over at Theo’s Roundtable this week, talking about how reviewers need to start using the more advanced tools they now have available to them and leave the old methods behind. What was great when it was introduced 20 years ago might no longer be as good, or easy to understand, and what we can use now.

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Lumagen Radiance 2021 Review

When Lumagen released their Radiance XD processor, it was a huge deal. When most displays and projectors lacked anything beyond a rudimentary color management system (CMS), or hid it away in the service menu, the Radiance unlocked the full control over colors, grayscale, and gamma to users. Instead of choosing between the display with the best image, and the one with the good image but less control, you could pick the best and know you can get it dialed in perfectly later on. It wasn’t the cheapest add-on accessory ever made, but it did something that many people didn’t think possible.

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Toshiba 50L5200U LCD TV Review

Toshiba 50L5200U LCD TV Angled ViewFlat panel HDTVs have moved from high end statement pieces to consumable goods at this point.  Technology has trickled down faster and faster to models in the product line.  Features that cost hundreds of dollars extra even a couple years ago are now standard on every model out there it seems at this point.  Much of that technology has made its way into the Toshiba 50L5200U LCD TV. Continue Reading →

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Home Theater Display Reviews and Measurements

When you look at a typical home theater display review, there are a few things you are guaranteed to see from any objective analysis.  You should see a grayscale chart, showing how accurate and linear it tracks across different values, and you’ll also see a CIE chart showing how accurate the colors are compared to the reference values.  You probably will see a gamma chart showing how well it tracks to a certain value (usually 2.2), and you might see contrast readings as well as maximum and minimum light output values.  All of this is very useful to someone to know how well a display performs, but there is a lot still missing from this data. Continue Reading →

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